This photograph is featured in the book  Ninety-Five: Meeting America's Farmed Animals in Stories and Photographs  pg. 97
  Lucky Lady  cheated death by escaping from an auction house and roaming the streets of New York City for hours. The 65-pound lamb was eventually caught by police and taken to Animal Care & Control.  Farm Sanctuary  was contacted and they agreed to take in the months-old lamb. She arrived at their bucolic New York Shelter a few days later; a far cry from the bustling city and its many slaughterhouses.

Lucky Lady recovered from her ordeal and will spend the rest of her days enjoying a spacious pasture, warm barn and the company of friends.
This photograph is featured in the book Ninety-Five: Meeting America's Farmed Animals in Stories and Photographs pg. 97 Lucky Lady cheated death by escaping from an auction house and roaming the streets of New York City for hours. The 65-pound lamb was eventually caught by police and taken to Animal Care & Control. Farm Sanctuary was contacted and they agreed to take in the months-old lamb. She arrived at their bucolic New York Shelter a few days later; a far cry from the bustling city and its many slaughterhouses. Lucky Lady recovered from her ordeal and will spend the rest of her days enjoying a spacious pasture, warm barn and the company of friends.
      Featured in the book  Ninety-Five: Meeting America's Farmed Animals in Stories and Photographs  pg. 77

 Jordan  was rescued by  Farm Sanctuary  from the Lancaster, Pennsylvania stockyards. He was a "downer" suffering from salt toxicity/water deprivation. "Downer" is the term the meat and dairy industries used to refer to animals so sick, diseased or disabled that they can not even stand on their own. Jordan lived 15 long, happy years at their New York shelter before he passed away.
Featured in the book Ninety-Five: Meeting America's Farmed Animals in Stories and Photographs pg. 77 Jordan was rescued by Farm Sanctuary from the Lancaster, Pennsylvania stockyards. He was a "downer" suffering from salt toxicity/water deprivation. "Downer" is the term the meat and dairy industries used to refer to animals so sick, diseased or disabled that they can not even stand on their own. Jordan lived 15 long, happy years at their New York shelter before he passed away.
      Featured in the book  Ninety-Five: Meeting America's Farmed Animals in Stories and Photographs  pg. 38

 Abbey  was part of a cruelty case involving 30 starving dairy cows in New York. Now she lives at  Farm Sanctuary  in Watkins Glen, NY.
Featured in the book Ninety-Five: Meeting America's Farmed Animals in Stories and Photographs pg. 38 Abbey was part of a cruelty case involving 30 starving dairy cows in New York. Now she lives at Farm Sanctuary in Watkins Glen, NY.
      Featured in the book  Ninety-Five: Meeting America's Farmed Animals in Stories and Photographs  pg. 60

 Rochester  was rescued by  Farm Sanctuary  from a man who was raising turkeys in his basement for the Thanksgiving market. Each year, 46 million turkeys are slaughtered for Thanksgiving meals.
Featured in the book Ninety-Five: Meeting America's Farmed Animals in Stories and Photographs pg. 60 Rochester was rescued by Farm Sanctuary from a man who was raising turkeys in his basement for the Thanksgiving market. Each year, 46 million turkeys are slaughtered for Thanksgiving meals.
      This photograph is featured in the book  Ninety-Five: Meeting America's Farmed Animals in Stories and Photographs  pg. 10

 Violet  was rescued from major veterinary school battery cage research facility. Large numbers of farmed animals are used in university agricultural research projects, and at some veterinary schools animals are used for "practice" surgeries. Fortunately for Violet, her university days are over; she is free from the battery cage and enjoying her life at  Farm Sanctuary  in New York.
This photograph is featured in the book Ninety-Five: Meeting America's Farmed Animals in Stories and Photographs pg. 10 Violet was rescued from major veterinary school battery cage research facility. Large numbers of farmed animals are used in university agricultural research projects, and at some veterinary schools animals are used for "practice" surgeries. Fortunately for Violet, her university days are over; she is free from the battery cage and enjoying her life at Farm Sanctuary in New York.
      Featured in the book  Ninety-Five: Meeting America's Farmed Animals in Stories and Photographs  pg. 106

 Fiona, Harley, Cornwall  and 16 other ducklings were rescued from a man who closed his farm. At  Farm Sanctuary , they have a home where their worth is recognized and their needs and desires are met. They swim together, explore in the cool grass together, and fall asleep in their cozy barn each night side by side.
Featured in the book Ninety-Five: Meeting America's Farmed Animals in Stories and Photographs pg. 106 Fiona, Harley, Cornwall and 16 other ducklings were rescued from a man who closed his farm. At Farm Sanctuary, they have a home where their worth is recognized and their needs and desires are met. They swim together, explore in the cool grass together, and fall asleep in their cozy barn each night side by side.
      Featured in the book  Ninety-Five: Meeting America's Farmed Animals in Stories and Photographs  pg. 29

 Rosie & Ronnie  were being taken from a factory farm to a slaughterhouse when the driver parked his triple-decker trailer and then abandoned it, leaving the animals in the hot sun without water. The trailer was seized and the pigs were taken to  Poplar Spring Sanctuary . Although the corporation who owned the pigs was not prosecuted for for abandoning them, they agreed to sign the pigs over to the sanctuary in lieu of paying them $10,000 to cover expenses. Forty of them, including Maggie and Aurora, were taken to  Farm Sanctuary's  New York shelter to live out the rest of their lives.
Featured in the book Ninety-Five: Meeting America's Farmed Animals in Stories and Photographs pg. 29 Rosie & Ronnie were being taken from a factory farm to a slaughterhouse when the driver parked his triple-decker trailer and then abandoned it, leaving the animals in the hot sun without water. The trailer was seized and the pigs were taken to Poplar Spring Sanctuary. Although the corporation who owned the pigs was not prosecuted for for abandoning them, they agreed to sign the pigs over to the sanctuary in lieu of paying them $10,000 to cover expenses. Forty of them, including Maggie and Aurora, were taken to Farm Sanctuary's New York shelter to live out the rest of their lives.
      Featured in the book  Ninety-Five: Meeting America's Farmed Animals in Stories and Photographs  pg. 45

A pregnant Misty was one of 26 cattle rescued by  Farm Sanctuary . She was used as a "breeding cow" forced to give birth so that her calves could be used for veal or beef. When their babies are torn from them, cows cry for days. Fortunately, Misty will never experience such a loss again. She and her son  David  (pictured) now live happily together with a family in Michigan.
Featured in the book Ninety-Five: Meeting America's Farmed Animals in Stories and Photographs pg. 45 A pregnant Misty was one of 26 cattle rescued by Farm Sanctuary. She was used as a "breeding cow" forced to give birth so that her calves could be used for veal or beef. When their babies are torn from them, cows cry for days. Fortunately, Misty will never experience such a loss again. She and her son David (pictured) now live happily together with a family in Michigan.
      This photograph is featured in the book  Ninety-Five: Meeting America's Farmed Animals in Stories and Photographs  1st page and back cover

 Bosey  was rescued as part of a neglect case in New York. She now lives at   Farm Sanctuary's  New York shelter, where she is currently (at the time of publication) one of the oldest members of the cattle herd.
This photograph is featured in the book Ninety-Five: Meeting America's Farmed Animals in Stories and Photographs 1st page and back cover Bosey was rescued as part of a neglect case in New York. She now lives at Farm Sanctuary's New York shelter, where she is currently (at the time of publication) one of the oldest members of the cattle herd.
      Featured in the book  Ninety-Five: Meeting America's Farmed Animals in Stories and Photographs  pg. 78

 Simon  was a seven pound pygmy goat when he was found wandering the streets of Brooklyn. He was underweight, alone, cold, scared, and suffering from severe pneumonia, lice infestation, sore mouth and giardiasis when a caring woman found him. Eventually he came to  Farm Sanctuary's  New York shelter. After receiving medical treatment and lots of love, he fully recovered and became one of the sanctuary's star ambassadors!

You can see this photo in the men's room of the People Barn at Farm Sanctuary...
Featured in the book Ninety-Five: Meeting America's Farmed Animals in Stories and Photographs pg. 78 Simon was a seven pound pygmy goat when he was found wandering the streets of Brooklyn. He was underweight, alone, cold, scared, and suffering from severe pneumonia, lice infestation, sore mouth and giardiasis when a caring woman found him. Eventually he came to Farm Sanctuary's New York shelter. After receiving medical treatment and lots of love, he fully recovered and became one of the sanctuary's star ambassadors! You can see this photo in the men's room of the People Barn at Farm Sanctuary...
      Featured in the book  Ninety-Five: Meeting America's Farmed Animals in Stories and Photographs  pg. 41

Born at a dairy, separated from his mother an sent to auction as a newborn,  Eli  was abandoned at a stockyard when he failed to sell for even one dollar. Fortunately, he was rescued along with four other Jersey calves and taken to  Farm Sanctuary's  California shelter. Eli lived a long, happy life until he passed away in 2007.
Featured in the book Ninety-Five: Meeting America's Farmed Animals in Stories and Photographs pg. 41 Born at a dairy, separated from his mother an sent to auction as a newborn, Eli was abandoned at a stockyard when he failed to sell for even one dollar. Fortunately, he was rescued along with four other Jersey calves and taken to Farm Sanctuary's California shelter. Eli lived a long, happy life until he passed away in 2007.