Derek Pashupa Goodwin

Ninety-Five Exhibit

"Animals are not here for us. They are here with us."

Ninety-Five book
Ninety-Five book

View the individual photographs and read about the animals

To celebrate and promote the release of the No Voice Unheard book Ninety-Five: Meeting America’s Farmed Animals in Stories and Photographs I am kicking off a gallery tour featuring my photographs of farm animals living in sanctuaries.

The book's name derives from the calculation that ninety-five is the average number of animals spared each year by one person’s vegan diet. In the book we meet some of the animals that have been rescued from various cruel circumstances to live their lives out peacefully on sanctuaries. In this environment they thrive and become ambassadors for the countless billions of animals that are not so fortunate. Ninety-Five shares some of their stories along with beautiful photographs. There are several writers and photographers, of which I am one.

The exhibit will feature photographs from the book as well as photographs that I feel round out that body of work. It will kick off at the new raw vegan restaurant Karma in Northampton, MA in early November of 2010. From there it will move down to New Orleans and be shown at the Swan River Yoga Studio. I will be searching for grants and locations to continue the exhibition beyond that.

View the individual photographs and read about the animals

Artist's Statement:

I have been photographing farm animals living in sanctuary for over ten years now, and it has been one of the blessings of my life. Because I have worked with Farm Sanctuary and Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary, two of the most prominent sanctuaries in the US, I have been able to meet and network with an incredibly diverse and talented group of people involved with the vegan and animal rights movements. This has influenced the trajectory of my life in countless ways. Yet it is the animals themselves who have opened my heart.

For me photographing the animals is a kind of meditation. Through my interactions with them I have come to see that they are each individuals. I think the cultural memes that define our understanding of farm animals tend to enable a false belief that each species represent one personality, always dimwitted and dependent upon us for their survival. Over the millennia that we have been domesticating animals we have created mythologies in order to ease our consciences about what we do to them. We reinforce these stereotypes by indoctrinating our children into our way of thinking through parenting, schooling, advertising and our use of language itself (counting our chickens before they hatch, killing two birds with one stone, etc;).

By the time we grow from the indoctrinated child to the supposedly autonomous adult the relationship between us and the animals we consume is distorted and buried in our subconscious minds. It is my belief that this hidden aspect of our psyches bubbles up to haunt us in the ways we do violence to each other as individuals and sovereign nation states. We can not on the one hand incorporate violence and subjugation into our diets and on the other hand hope for peace on Earth.

It is with these core beliefs directing me that I set out to show the beauty and individuality of farm animals to people who may never meet the living creatures. There is really no photograph that I can take that will replace that experience, but I feel that my best photographs transmit the beauty, spirit and dignity of the beings to the viewer. The hope of art is to create a transcendent experience. My farm animal photography exists to push the envelope of compassion.

Featured Photographs (stories coming soon)

Simon
Simon
Jasper
Jasper
Little Jay
Little Jay
Patsy
Patsy
Celeste
Celeste
Megan and Malice
Megan and Malice
Andy & Elvis
Andy & Elvis
Abby
Abby
Rosie & Ronnie
Rosie & Ronnie
Brandy
Brandy
Eli
Eli
Bosey
Bosey
Danny
Danny